Ask MFC

iPhotography Tipsn/a

http://i.imgur.com/fHsLUi8.gif
Hey MFC. So for my second post, I thought I'd ask what everyone does to get such good results/quality out of their figure pictures(aside from the camera). I have an Olympus SP-600UZ I managed to borrow from one of my parents. Probably not the greatest camera compared to a professional DSLR but it's what I can make do with at the moment aside from my phone. I intend on getting a foam whiteboard for a neutral background and learning how to photoshop in backgrounds as well as touchups, etc. All advice is welcome :)
Twitter Facebook Pinterest

Comments (9)

010 months agocheshirecatcheshirecat
Asako (10 months ago) #1542302Getting a job will let you buy something excellent, so good luck with it. :D
Check out club #75 for more general (or specific) information, too. It is pretty quiet day to day, but questions get answered, and there is stuff to read through already there. ^^


Oooh thanks! This is just what I was looking for :D
010 months agoAsakoAsako Om nom nom
Getting a job will let you buy something excellent, so good luck with it. :D

Check out club #75 for more general (or specific) information, too. It is pretty quiet day to day, but questions get answered, and there is stuff to read through already there. ^^
010 months ago (10 months ago)cheshirecatcheshirecat
Asako (10 months ago) #1542068Plenty, but you should do your own research and decide on a brand/system to commit to, since everybody has their own brand loyalties and preferences. (I, for instance, champion Pentax despite Canon and Nikon being the popular choices, but I don't deny their quality either). Also try to get an idea of your budget. You can get a second hand kit for a few hundred dollars, or brand new from as low as $400ish. Getting a second hand last generation mid-range camera is likely to be a better investment, though.

Yeah I agree there. I always do research into things before I purchase them(usually technology wise) and I'm not hesitant when it comes to buying second hand items, even if they're a little older. It saves money for one and if you can find a really good camera in great condition, it just seals the deal :P Hopefully I can get this job at the Pentagon I'm working on atm. Gotta get my clearance first and if I get that, I'm pretty much set :D
010 months agoAsakoAsako Om nom nom
cheshirecat (10 months ago) #1542059Thanks everyone. Yeah, I just wanted to know what I could make do with at the present moment since I just got back to being unemployed...fortunately I have a tripod so that saves money there. Any suggestions for an entry-level DSLR I could look into for when I get a job again?

Plenty, but you should do your own research and decide on a brand/system to commit to, since everybody has their own brand loyalties and preferences. (I, for instance, champion Pentax despite Canon and Nikon being the popular choices, but I don't deny their quality either). Also try to get an idea of your budget. You can get a second hand kit for a few hundred dollars, or brand new from as low as $400ish. Getting a second hand last generation mid-range camera is likely to be a better investment, though.
010 months ago (10 months ago)cheshirecatcheshirecat
Thanks everyone. Yeah, I just wanted to know what I could make do with at the present moment since I just got back to being unemployed...fortunately I have a tripod so that saves money there. Any suggestions for an entry-level DSLR I could look into for when I get a job again?
010 months ago (10 months ago)ShikareeShikaree
Get a tripod. And if you're gonna be taking a decent number of photos indoors, get a lighting setup. Neither are very expensive and you can get them on amazon or a local store.

But at the end of the day, a good technical quality figure picture is solely from the camera. There's no "aside from the camera."

Obviously there are filters, color balance, tone, contrast, etc etc lots of things you can do in photoshop. (guides for those everywhere) But none of them are going to be better than a plain good picture. It's really better to just take a good picture and then use photoshop to improve on certain elements, rather than to use photoshop to fix mistakes or camera inadequacies.

Basically, if you have a little bit of money to spend, get a tripod and lighting. If you have a little bit more, get an entry-level dslr or milc. The difference is just night and day.
010 months agoAsakoAsako Om nom nom
Try to find the ISO setting, and make sure it is at the lowest it goes. If you can get a small tripod, it will help take more stable shots, though resting on objects (even a folded towel or similar) can do in a pinch, depending on your workspace.

Don't rely on photoshop. You can do some basic tweaks to the photo in it (levels, white balance etc) but putting in artificial backgrounds rarely works out well. The rest really depends on the kind of shooting you want to do.
010 months agofrostocelotfrostocelot
If you have a camera that lets you adjust aperture, you can play around with the depth of field that gives you those pretty pictures with the blurry backgrounds. This type of photography allows the figure to "pop out" in focus. I think your camera model does not allow you control of aperture however, so what you can try is get up close to your figure while having it posed far away from any background surface. The auto setting on your camera might achieve that same blurry effect.
010 months agojenajena Moon Prism Power!
In my opinion, figure photos look much nicer when the background is real rather than photoshopped in. Either backdrops, little set ups with props, monitors/screens as backgrounds or physical landscapes outdoors look more natural unless you have pro photoshop skills. Thats just my opinion!

User

Information

Related Items (0)

Tags (0)

Related Clubs (0)