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Giving your nendoroid a tan [Experimental Stage]Giving your nendoroid a tan [Experimental Stage]

LehstLehst1 year agoTutorial
This "tutorial" is more like a chronicle of my recent experiment in giving my nendoroid a tan. If interested, then read on about my amateur process!

I have an extra faceplate so I figured, why not maim the poor thing with my haphazard ideas? Ultimately, I wanted to give the nendoroid tan skin, while preserving the eyes that are already there.

http://s1.tsuki-board.net/image/Lehst1498840570.png
Pictured is Armin's faceplate ITEM #198406 and Clear's hair ITEM #348411. I don't feel like linking them in the sidebar.

My first attempt ended in abject failure. I used watery acrylic on a palette and a small paintbrush. There were too many overlapping, translucent brushstrokes, and there was no way to paint fast enough to apply an even coat. It is especially difficult because the face plate is not an even, flat surface.

My next idea was to use a spray bottle. I put in a ratio of about 1 part paint and 6 parts water, and shook the bottle up REALLY FAST to thoroughly mix the two. Well... that was a better idea than the first. The paint was applied with few spritz, but I ended up getting it all over my arms lol. The spray area was too wide! Plus there were air bubbles on the faceplate. They eventually popped, but they disrupt the coat.

http://s1.tsuki-board.net/image/Lehst1498840572.png

I used Q-tips to remove the paint from the eyes. Also handy for absorbing excess pools of paint that form on the ears. You can just lightly hover the cotton above the pool without rubbing and it soaks right in.

Also a little rubbing alcohol can lift off the paint and it doesn't damage the eyes. I have done this like 20 times now, to this same faceplate. The paint GSC uses is really high-quality stuff and it is still undamaged. Edit: no wait, upon close inspection, it seems the eyes are ever so slightly wearing off. But you have to be rubbing and repainting a LOT, and it still looks fine.

The first coat turned out like this after drying for 30 minutes:

http://s1.tsuki-board.net/image/Lehst1498840574.png

The tan one is on the left. Only a little bit darker than the original. But they say doing several very thin coats is the way to go.

On to round 2.

The best idea ended up being something ridiculous. I twisted off the spray bottle's cap and just dumped the paint onto the face. Voila!!

http://s1.tsuki-board.net/image/Lehst1498840576.png

It looks so even and lovely. At least compared to using a brush. >.>;;

But then I screwed it all up when I removed the excess from the eyes. The rubbing alcohol ran off and onto the skin. OTZ

http://s1.tsuki-board.net/image/Lehst1498840578.png

Also I didn't get the paint out of his mouth too great. It is hard getting into the corners. I need some precision swabs or something.
Or how about those blending sticks meant for drawing? They are sturdy and pointy. If I find a clean one lying around... >.>;;

BUT!!!

If you screw up, it doesn't matter if the hair covers that part! rofl XDD

http://s1.tsuki-board.net/image/Lehst1498840723.png

If I was going to make this permanent, I would spray some Testers Dullcote to seal it. Or some other matte-finish clear sealer. As it is, I'm going to take all this mess off with some rubbing alcohol, and rinse under the faucet.

I didn't use any primer in any of this. I was too cheap to buy some, but also, I wasn't sure how it would react to the pre-existing eyes and rubbing alcohol. I needed to be able to erase and start again. Those with experience please feel free to comment! (I really don't know what I'm doing lol.)

Conclusion: Well, it looks pretty good! However the paint still isn't even, not only because I screwed up, but because I didn't get it smoothly over the ears. At the end of the day though, it won't be as good as an official tan nendoroid with the darker plastic. But I want to use pre-painted faceplates for dark-skinned custom characters, so I will be trying this again.

Also if you have any questions or random gibberish go on ahead! ^_^

Thanks for reading~
3,667 hits • 15 comments

Comments15

1pt
Milady-Alluca (1 year ago) #29194920Thanks so much for posting this, I read it awhile ago but I finally might be able to have time to experiment myself soon and I'm really excited since I have a couple custom ideas that really would look better even if just slightly tanner than standard GSC pale xD I've tried painting small skin parts on bodies with very limited success but just dunking a face in paint mix water sounds worth a shot for that smoothness! Luckily splits have been good for accumulating unwanted faces to experiment on :9
lol no problem. I never did get around to doing this permanently, but I am sure I will. I'm just too cheap to buy a lot of good paint, and do it differently. ^^;; art supplies really add up.
good luck!
1 year ago
1pt
Milady-Alluca Obnoxiously Wordy
Thanks so much for posting this, I read it awhile ago but I finally might be able to have time to experiment myself soon and I'm really excited since I have a couple custom ideas that really would look better even if just slightly tanner than standard GSC pale xD I've tried painting small skin parts on bodies with very limited success but just dunking a face in paint mix water sounds worth a shot for that smoothness! Luckily splits have been good for accumulating unwanted faces to experiment on :9
1 year ago
0pt
Faux (1 year ago) #21556560snipThank you very much for explaining. ^_^
1 year ago
0pt
Lehst (1 year ago) #21445806ok. I am a novice though, can you be more specific on what this gloss/satin coat is (is it a primer? what brand?) And what solvent it is impervious to? So far I have been using laquer thinner to remove unwanted paint (to be specific, I have used to remove Goodsmile's painted details.)
And what brand of oil paint? I have Testors enamels here. I'm sorry to bother you with so many questions, but I can't take your suggetions without more details.


Gloss/satin coat is basically a varnish which is a liquid you apply on your model to protect the underlying paint. It's dries clear and can be brushed or sprayed (from a can) depending on what you bought. Your local art or hobby store should have a spray can for sale. I would suggest getting the ones from your hobby store (spray can type) since they're specifically made from models. The gloss/satin refers to the finish which the varnish will give once it's dry.

I advise that you get an acrylic satin finish varnish. Thinned oil paints shouldn't penetrate through acrylic varnish and I haven't experienced this from my previously finished model kits. Satin finish is advised so that the oil wash has something to grip on to but if you wish for a much easier clean up, then gloss varnish is your choice.

I've only used Van Gogh's and Winsor & Newton's oil paints and they worked marvelous. These brands are artist oil paints and they might be a little expensive but a tube or 2 is worth it if you're doing customs. As for the thinner, you should get an odorless turpenoid, preferably made by Weber. I have no experience with other thinners and normal turpentine stinks and can penetrate through the acrylic varnish so avoid that.

Apologies if I was being vague in my previous posts. Feel free to ask more if you're lost.
1 year ago
0pt
Faux (1 year ago) #21444789Which is why I advised that you gloss/satin coat the faceplate first which protects the underlying paint/details. 2 coats should be enough to not damage the eyes.ok. I am a novice though, can you be more specific on what this gloss/satin coat is (is it a primer? what brand?) And what solvent it is impervious to? So far I have been using laquer thinner to remove unwanted paint (to be specific, I have used to remove Goodsmile's painted details.)

And what brand of oil paint? I have Testors enamals here. I'm sorry to bother you with so many questions, but I can't take your suggetions without more details.
1 year ago
0pt
Lehst (1 year ago) #21390538But then I would inevitably get oil paint on the eyes. Unless there is a brand or some science I am not understanding, the solvents to remove oil paint would be too strong and destroy the eyes. If I wanted to paint new eyes I would just start with an official tan nendo.

Which is why I advised that you gloss/satin coat the faceplate first which protects the underlying paint/details. 2 coats should be enough to not damage the eyes.
1 year ago
0pt
Faux (1 year ago) #21389429You should try using oil paints and do a a normal or gunk wash. I advise that you gloss/satin coat it first though. The long curing time for oil paint means that it has more time to even out itself and easier to clean up mistakes.
Dot filtering should work as well.
But then I would inevitably get oil paint on the eyes. Unless there is a brand or some science I am not understanding, the solvents to remove oil paint would be too strong and destroy the eyes. If I wanted to paint new eyes I would just start with an official tan nendo.
1 year ago
0pt
You should try using oil paints and do a a normal or gunk wash. I advise that you gloss/satin coat it first though. The long curing time for oil paint means that it has more time to even out itself and easier to clean up mistakes.

Dot filtering should work as well.
1 year ago
3pt
I can't believe I read "giving your nendoroids a tan" and thought, oh, just put them out in the sun. *facepalm. Very creative idea, though!
1 year ago
0pt
Nice!
I would like to achieve the opposite and have a lighter skin on some of my figures :)
1 year ago
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