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ponnie

ponnie~Donyatsu Huntress~

«Yay, airbrush!»
Regular Boarderlv26Female29 years oldSiberiaProject Manager @ Sibirixvk.com
Last visit 2 hours ago • Joined 5 years ago • 130,142 hits (43)

Figures370

About

Show(s)
Series: Jeeves and Wooster, Arrested Development, Community. Anime: Princess Tutu, Cowboy Bebop, Mushishi.
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Oscar Wilde, Jerome K. Jerome, John Steinbeck, James Joyce, Roger Zelazny, Pelham Grenville Wodehouse
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Fallout 1&2, Gothic 1&2, TES Morrowind, South Park: TSOT
MOE Point(s)
blonde in red, donuts, cats, pouting face, blush, boobies
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nu-jazz, downtempo, trip-hop
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Canon 600D, Nokia Lumia 830
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VAIO Laptop

Articles92

Comments251 comments

0pt
ponnie (27 days ago) #26335052Gaianotes main paints line is lacquer. They do make enamels now but only have several colors :3
Yes, you need to thin their paint a bit for better flow. If you have hard time finding native Gaia thinner, Mr. Leveling Thinner should work just fine.


You life saver <3 Are Mr.Color also lacquer then? (I'm guessing their Aqueous line as acrylic)
26 days ago
0pt
ponnie ~Donyatsu Huntress~
Imuya (27 days ago) #26321593This is gonna sound hecka stupid, but do Gaianotes Surfacerless paints need thinning? (What kind of paint do they fall into? Enamel/Lacquer/Acrylic) Like a tit, forgot to order thinner from Sealmodel lmao.
Gaianotes main paints line is lacquer. They do make enamels now but only have several colors :3
Yes, you need to thin their paint a bit for better flow. If you have hard time finding native Gaia thinner, Mr. Leveling Thinner should work just fine.
27 days ago
0pt
This is gonna sound hecka stupid, but do Gaianotes Surfacerless paints need thinning? (What kind of paint do they fall into? Enamel/Lacquer/Acrylic) Like a tit, forgot to order thinner from Sealmodel lmao.
27 days ago
0pt
ponnie ~Donyatsu Huntress~
Imuya (1 month ago) #25171557I think that might be part of where I messed up the shading! I tried doing it before top coat, damn. I'll give that one another go, thank you so much :3
I could never get along with oils, even on paper/canvas, so I think I'll just try and work around acrylics and stuff for now.

Happy to help anytime :3

Looking forward to your new works!
1 month ago
0pt
I think that might be part of where I messed up the shading! I tried doing it before top coat, damn. I'll give that one another go, thank you so much :3
I could never get along with oils, even on paper/canvas, so I think I'll just try and work around acrylics and stuff for now.
1 month ago
0pt
ponnie ~Donyatsu Huntress~
Imuya (1 month ago) #25152300Yeah I do that, I don't think I'm very good at it as you can see here:
http://jpeghost.com/images/2017/08/27/IMG_1999.jpg
I am looking at some more complex kits with deeper shading than what I seem capable of with pastels alone (some colours just don't really stick to deeper than a pale dusting) and I really love the smooth Matt effect I see on airbrushed figures that I can't seem to get with hand brushing.


Smooth matte effect is quality finishing coat, that's it. So far I got best results with Mr. Super Clear UV Flat, it's smooth and velvety to the touch. Costs quite a lot for a small bottle you get but it's soooo worth it.

For pastels to stick better you need a matte paint or a matte coat before applying pastels. I liked the results I got with Pebeo acrylics, pastels stick very good to them. Sometimes, to get deeper shades you need to use really dark pastels, like 5-7 tones darker than your base coat. Or even a contrasting shade, for example, red is best shaded with dark blue, dark purple or even black pastels.

Airbrush does work better for gradients and soft shades but it's nowhere as simple — it's a combo of quality tool, steady hands, air pressure control and proper paint thinning. I see many people still shade with pastels over airbrush coats just because it's easier to fix. For example, if you do clear skin, and shade in a wrong place it's redoing the whole piece from the start while with pastels you can just wash it away.

Oh, one more thing! I know people who use oil paints for shading because they dry very slow and with due patience you can blend these into very fine gradients. Water soluble oils are nowhere as toxic as the usual ones but just as good for fine detailing — and they dry faster, a couple of days instead of weeks.
1 month ago
0pt
ponnie (1 month ago) #25151329Have you tried shading with chalk pastels? They are perfect to make smooth gradient shades when painting with a brush. You grate the chalk into powder, dip a dry brush in it and then apply in places you need to shade or even highlight. On smooth paint they work similar to airbrush shading, you get a nice soft gradient.
Like this.
https://static.myfigurecollection.net/image/ponnie1492260322.jpeg


Yeah I do that, I don't think I'm very good at it as you can see here:

http://jpeghost.com/images/2017/08/27/IMG_1999.jpg
I am looking at some more complex kits with deeper shading than what I seem capable of with pastels alone (some colours just don't really stick to deeper than a pale dusting) and I really love the smooth Matt effect I see on airbrushed figures that I can't seem to get with hand brushing.
1 month ago
0pt
ponnie ~Donyatsu Huntress~
Imuya (1 month ago) #25130752I don't mind the chemistry work. On my first few kits I got the paint smooth as heck but oh god do I suck at the shading part. Even with retarder I can't seem to get it to work without things drying like crazy. I have experience gradienting with spray cans but obviously the flow of a standard can is gonna be a way too big a spray for a kit gradient, wondered if I'd be able to achieve something a bit easier with an airbrush.

Have you tried shading with chalk pastels? They are perfect to make smooth gradient shades when painting with a brush. You grate the chalk into powder, dip a dry brush in it and then apply in places you need to shade or even highlight. On smooth paint they work similar to airbrush shading, you get a nice soft gradient.

Like this.

https://static.myfigurecollection.net/image/ponnie1492260322.jpeg
1 month ago
0pt
I don't mind the chemistry work. On my first few kits I got the paint smooth as heck but oh god do I suck at the shading part. Even with retarder I can't seem to get it to work without things drying like crazy. I have experience gradienting with spray cans but obviously the flow of a standard can is gonna be a way too big a spray for a kit gradient, wondered if I'd be able to achieve something a bit easier with an airbrush.
1 month ago
0pt
Belated Happy Birthday ;D
1 month ago
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